wp4564c0d0_1b.jpg
wp0ffe064e_1b.jpg

wpb30af9e2_1b.jpg

wpa7712fe3_1b.jpg

wp54bb5138_1b.jpg

wp732febcd_1b.jpg

wpe77c3d42_1b.jpg

wpf0863d4a_1b.jpg

wpf2e2c159_1b.jpg

wp82012613_1b.jpg

wp053b9042_1b.jpg

wp54e2569b_1b.jpg

wp76ff3b3c_1b.jpg

wp2518957b_1b.jpg

wp6213b194_1b.jpg

wp04d1ce20_1b.jpg

wpe3449188_1b.jpg

wp95b70274_1b.jpg

wpedbf0b29_1b.jpg

wp13cb5697_1b.jpg

wp42f0a5aa_1b.jpg

wp5ea462a2_1b.jpg

wp5f275c7c_1b.jpg

wp39b7ec63_1b.jpg

wpe6da7922_1b.jpg

wpfba1451b_1b.jpg

wpc7a1fac5_1b.jpg
IN ANCIENT TIMES
wp1d74a6d9_1b.jpg
wp239b0d2c_1b.jpg
wp28af0f82_1b.jpg
wp6a526509_1b.jpg
THE ORIGINS OF THE NAME OF THE VILLAGE
The determination of the source of the origin of many old place names is often very difficult and illusive, and the information upon which this small piece of detective work is based is to be found on Ordnance Survey maps, Tithe maps and various books which contain references to the locality that is now known as Fochriw.
It was identified as Brohru Carn in the 12th century and a reference to Fforch y Rhiw is made in the book Parish of Gelligaer by T.V.Davies in the section dealing with Roman History and the route of Heol Adam. It states that “The holding called Fforch y Rhiw, the fork in the road, is mentioned in several Gelligaer leases of the 17 century. The name probably arises from a number of old tracks in the Brithdir Hamlet which tend to converge near Fochriw”.

Another version is obtained from a booklet called Place-Names of Glamorgan published in 1908 as illustrated opposite.







It has also been known as Boch Rhiw Carn, Ffochreiw, Fochrhiw, Vochriw, Vochrhiw and currently Fochriw.

TOPOGRAPHY

General

Occupying the north-eastern region of what was the County of Glamorgan, Fochriw is surrounded by the old counties of Monmouthshire, now called Blaenau Gwent, on the east, Brecknockshire, now Powys, on the north and the County Borough of Merthyr Tydfil on the west. On the south lies what was Caerphilly Urban District Council which also used to belong to Glamorgan and, since the new boundary changes, is now the administrative district to which Fochriw belongs. The region is typical of the south Wales coalfield in that it consists of narrow industrialised valleys and intervening moorlands.
The Moorlands.
A view of the north-eastern part of Fochriw, from the headland of Mynydd Fochriw, with the Brecon Beacons in the background. This depicts the moorland and very open countryside into which Fochriw has been placed
However, the Iron Leases map dated 1763, also shown opposite, identifies the road to Fochriw when the area was just a gathering of hill farms.
wpf265ef08_1b.jpg
wpd7cd776c_1b.jpg
wp64d441a0_1b.jpg
wpe9473ca6_1b.jpg