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RELIGION
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public transport available and although the railway was open and passed through the middle of the village, there was no station at Penybank.

Anyone knowing the topography of the land between Fochriw and Penybank will appreciate the dedication of the congregation who had to walk there, a distance of just over a mile, both half miles of which culminated at 1,350 feet at Pentwyn from a start of 1,110 at Fochriw and 900 at Penybank.

It is thought that, during the Second World War, probably during April 1942, the chapel was sold to the Penticostal Assemblies of God, the first mention of this being a report in the Merthyr Express, during January 1944, of a tea with the Pastor William Griffiths of Bedlinog being the incumbent. He eventually moved to live in 2 Chapel Row, Penybank.

The chapel closed when the whole village was demolished following an earthquake in the 1970’s.

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