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INVENTORS
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lamps, mentions of which are contained in the previous section. However, evidence of the actual device or patents covering same has not come to light.
During the remainder of 1914 a final specification was drawn up and a number of modifications to the design undertaken.
Once again, during January 1915, accusations of breaches of other patents were leveled by unknown persons, however, two of the patents namely No 619/1865 and No 20275/1898, had already expired and Henry Davies fiercely defended his designs on the basis that the principles involved were original.
The prototype relay was of a two pole design and it was at this time that he advised G.E.C. that he was developing a four pole version.
Tests of the prototype relay were carried out underground which initially resulted in a small spark being generated which later model did not produce.
A letter from G.E.C. dated 3 February 1915 advised Henry Davies that their Mr. Coates was to visit the Patents Office to discuss the specification since the Examiner had not yet completed his search and could not confirm that the device had not previously been patented.
In advance of the patent being granted other relays were being tested and, in February of that year, a four pole relay in an iron case was on test with the Great Western Colliery Company who were very pleased with it and were expected to place an order. WAS THIS THE FIRST ORDER FOR THE FIRST INTRINSICALLY SAFE RELAY IN THE WORLD????
A letter from G.E.C. advised that six relays had been manufactured and a further five were under construction. They also mentioned the ORIGINAL SAMPLE IN A WOODEN CASE WHICH IS NOW IN POSSESION OF IFOR COGGAN.
In their letter dated 22 March 1915, G.E.C. requested Henry Davies to provide one of his new types of relay since the four pole unit on test with Baldwins, Port Talbot was not sensitive enough. However he replied that he could not oblige since “My hands are too full and my boss is afraid that I am neglecting the navvy part of the work”. He went on to say that he was currently employed in finishing a sample relay for Mr Hannah, the Managing Director for Blaina, and he intended to place it before the Coal Owners Committee and challenge them to test it.
The Coal Owners Association had appointed a sub-committee to deal with signalling requirements under the new Act, as well as improving trams to reduce coal dust and wastage of coal. He had been ordered to make a 1/8 inch scale model of a new tram in brass and his hands were full. He further stated that “My engineer is frantic over these matters saying that "it is a waste of time making such trash" and he tries to stop me making them”.
It is obvious from his letter to G.E.C. dated 19 April 1915, that Henry Davies did not possess all  necessary equipment to enable the manufacture of prototypes to be undertaken expeditiously since, when advising that he had completed another relay, he mentioned that the original core diameter of 5/8  inch had to be filed down to ½ inch diameter. Therefore he did not possess or have access to a lathe.