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IN ANCIENT TIMES
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The hay was then stored in the loft of the barn which was attached to the farmhouse and when that was full, the upstairs of Ty Mawr was used. Ty Mawr in those days was an uninhabited house and the hay was pitch-forked through the upstairs sash windows, ensuring that stacking commenced at the far side of the room in order to allow our exit down the stairs.

The downstairs was converted to a cow bier shortly afterwards.
Part of  Fochriw and Darran Valley as seen from the trackbed of  the old Brecon & Merthyr Railway on the northern moorland.
A view of the lower part of Mynydd Fochriw as it drops down to the moorland plain
The area immediately below the stones is the location of an old epademic graveyard. Opencast work had to cease at this point when it was discovered
Another view of the epademic burial ground from the Mynydd Fochriw side of the valley
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