wpa69f6a5d_1b.jpg
wp255b278e_1b.jpg

wp43f36b64_1b.jpg

wp50c95e72_1b.jpg

wp6d87753c_1b.jpg

wpb0c596b5_1b.jpg

wp0f4d3734_1b.jpg

wp96d5037f_1b.jpg

wp7e7c0f6c_1b.jpg

wpb8caaf92_1b.jpg

wpd5113390_1b.jpg

wp4cfb291e_1b.jpg

wp245a4df4_1b.jpg

wp1923115a_1b.jpg

wp79dc5a9c_1b.jpg

wpc54f07c0_1b.jpg

wpb7b76dfa_1b.jpg

wp1f66dda4_1b.jpg

wpf3103802_1b.jpg

wp2d0d4901_1b.jpg

wp61cb660f_1b.jpg

wp016bd99b_1b.jpg

wpa8945188_1b.jpg

wpe4534269_1b.jpg

wp94da9e1d_1b.jpg

wp2f33bbbb_1b.jpg

wp4634aa2b_1b.jpg

DEVELOPMENT
wpfb7fbe3f_1b.jpg
wp6c40d069_1b.jpg
wp13366bc4_1b.jpg
wp66b3c8b8_1b.jpg

Bare knuckle boxing at Twyn y waun

“Merthyr Express” 9 September, 1865  Pugilistic    One of the unhopeful signs of our times - a pugilistic encounter - took place on Vochriw mountain on Monday evening last. Being an improper affair, they managed for some time to elude our vigilant constabulary. We have no doubts the belligerants (whose names are not worth recording) will hear more of this from another quarter.

“Merthyr Express” 16 February 1867  The Ring   On Monday morning, there was a “mill” for £1 a side, on the mountain at Twynywaun, between Cornelius Crowley, the “Cock of the Walk” of Dowlais, and James McDonald, the “Chinese Bantam” of Merthyr. Both men had undergone the necessary preparatory training for the fight, and bets, to a large extent in half-pence, were made upon the result of the contest, each champion being in almost equal favour with the lovers of this delightful pastime. Great efforts were made to keep the “whereabouts” from the police, but the blue gentry got scent of the little affair, and resolved that it should not be settled without their assistance. The men, however, started early, tended by their seconds, and when a numerous crowd of admirers arrived on the mountain, a ring was formed. The usual preliminaries considerably abbreviated, the champions set to their brutal work. Fourteen rounds had been fought when the police hove in sight, and the champions skidaddled in two directions. Crowley ran to Rhymney whither he was pursued and surrounded opposite the Police Station there. McDonald fled to the Chinese Covers, from which he was brought by the police, soon after the other arrived from Rhymney. Crowley’s eyes were black and swollen, and he had evidently been more severely punished than McDonald. Both men were brought before Mr. Fowler, and bound over to keep the peace for six months.

“Merthyr Express” 16 February 1867  Monday morning: prize fight on mountain at Twynywaun - Cornelius Crowley (“Cock of the Walk” of Dowlais) and James McDonald (“Chinese Bantam” of Merthyr) - was dispersed by the police. Both men were brought before Mr Fowler and bound over.