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IRON
AND
COAL
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stacks at the Fochriw Colliery had collapsed. Fortunately, no one was injured.”

Seven years after the closure of the colliery the following was reported in the 30 August 1930 issue of the Merthyr Express

Land Marks: Removal of Last Colliery High Stack   The last of the prominent landmarks was removed from the village on Friday, when the last high stack of the collieries which are now dismantled, was razed to the ground.
The map below is dated 27 March 1924 and depicts the underground workings of the Fochriw South Pit at the time of closure which was a week later.

It is reproduced courtesy of the National Museum of Wales and GKN
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