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IRON
AND
COAL
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The Construction of Ogilvie Colliery in “00” 4 cm = 1 foot scale
Commencement Date January 2008
Completion Date “Never”

UNDER CONSTRUCTION
Preamble

I have been a railway modeller for many years and, as an extension to my current layout, I decided to make a model of Ogilvie Colliery as I knew it between 1960 and 1964.

I have had much third party interest in this model and, as a result, have decided to provide details of it on this website.

One of the most difficult aspect of making a “scratch-built”model is finding the information upon which to base it. The most important data being the scale.

A “scratch-built” model is one where most of the component parts are made from basic materials and not from  commercial model kits such as the Airfix aeroplane packs.

I was fortunate to have a scaled fire-fighting plan of the colliery which showed the layout in respect to pumping mains, fire hydrants etc., however, I then had to convert the drawing dimensions to suit the 00 scale and determine if I had the room for it in my attic. This exercise dictated that I had to reduce the width and length of the model to fit it into the available space of  14 feet by 4 feet.

Having determined that it was possible I then spent many months producing individual scaled drawings of the headgear, winding engine house, workshops, lamp-room, stores etc and fine tuning them so that they would all fit into their allotted space whilst generating a plausible layout.

Although the plan was invaluable, I also had to determine the other two dimensions of the headgear and buildings and this was achieved by comparison of dimensions from photographs which produced the headgear at 16 inches high which, in turn, determined the size of the rest of the items.

For a project of this magnitude, it is very important that, before committing oneself, an investigation into part availability is undertaken, and, whereas materials for buildings and their fitments are readily available to the modeller, the production of the headgear sheaves is another matter.

To manufacture these from scratch would require a modeller’s lathe, an item which I did not, and still do not possess. However, I was able to track down a brass etching manufacturer who would make any item one required from  brass sheet.

The Headgear

The headgear structure is made from  polystyrene H, I and lattice girderwork which are glued together using polystyrene cement.

The production of the sheaves proved to be somewhat of a “challenge”.

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